The Charter: A Vision and Roadmap

The Michigan Good Food Charter is a roadmap for a food system that is rooted in local communities and centered on good food. The charter outlines six goals to advance the vision by 2020.

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News

  • A Bite-sized Look at Progress on Farms and Farmers

    A Bite-sized Look at Progress on Farms and Farmers

    This is the second in a five-part series updating readers on progress made in the five priority areas of the Michigan Good Food Charter agenda. In March, we looked at progress on Good Food Access. With planting season underway and in anticipation of the upcoming bounty of Michigan produce, this week we’ll take a “bite-sized” look at the priority area of Farms and Farmers.

  • Muskegon Prescribes Food for Health

    Muskegon Prescribes Food for Health

    Many of us who live in middle class or upper middle class neighborhoods with beautiful trees, parks nearby and easy access with our cars to a grocery store within blocks or just a few miles, don’t realize that some neighborhoods live in an urban desert—no place to buy food for your family except potato chips and other unhealthy food you may find at a gas station.

  • The Good Food Movement in Kalamazoo: A Snapshot

    The Good Food Movement in Kalamazoo: A Snapshot

    A video snapshot of Good Food efforts in Kalamazoo, first shown at the 2016 Michigan Good Food Summit.

  • “10 Cents a Meal” Report: State pilot expands successfully

    “10 Cents a Meal” Report: State pilot expands successfully

    Last May, michiganfood.org featured “10 Cents a Meal”, a program that the state Legislature subsequently adopted as a pilot project to provide schools with match incentive funding up to 10 cents per meal to purchase and serve Michigan-grown fruits, vegetables and dry beans. In March of this year, a report on the pilot was released to the Michigan Legislature. It highlights many successes.

  • Spring is Primetime to Network for Michigan’s Meat Processors

    Spring is Primetime to Network for Michigan’s Meat Processors

    Spring is here, and Michigan’s fruit and vegetable producers are busy prepping fields, starting seeds, and generally ramping up for the summer growing season. The same is true for many livestock producers, who are busy with young animals and pasture management.